- First, will the new Marriott be convenient? The old Starwood often was not, especially for people seeking lower-price properties. - Starwood regularly lapped Marriott on matters of coolness, though. Its W, Westin and Aloft brands offered the possibility that your hotel room could look and feel like your bedroom at home. Will Marriott impede Starwood’s culture of innovation, just as the company is facing the enormous new threat from Airbnb and its appeal to fans of quirk, local culture and value? - And then, there’s the loyalty programs. Frequent travelers want their hotel stays to count for something. The Starwood Preferred Guest program has drawn particularly passionate, opinionated members. But it’s a rare merger that results in better benefits for all elite-level travelers. Marriott is still several months away from announcing crucial details about the future of the program, but how much will it take away from wary S.P.G. fans like me? For the acquisition to succeed, creative employees need to stick around. Because the company owns only a tiny fraction of its hotels, the real estate developers it partners with must want to raise the various Marriott flags and hire the company to manage the properties. Get the full story at The New York Times