The stakes thus are huge and online travel brands which have built their base from leisure travel are eyeing the corporate space. After all, a traveller is a traveller, whether she’s travelling for leisure or business and she cannot be expected to switch modes just because it is a “company trip”. Earlier this year, Booking.com launched Booking.com for Business, which is geared for small businesses without managed travel programmes – a massive chunk of the market, particularly in APAC which is dominated by SMEs. Company managers or administrators can create Booking.com for Business accounts for free, book rooms for their employees, or send their staff invitations and they can book the travel on their own. The administrators can coordinate company bookings and review reports by department, team or individual employees. Employees using Booking.com for Business can also book leisure trips, but only their business travel bookings will feed into company reports. Expedia Inc has its Egencia brand which is expanding aggressively into Asia, and is set to open point of sale in Singapore and Hong Kong. In 2014, the company announced it had broken the US$5 billion gross booking mark, hit near 90% online adoption rates of its proprietary online travel platform and grew its global presence to more than 60 countries – a six-fold increase since 2010. Get the full story at Web In Travel Read also "Understanding the shopping habits of business travelers" at Skift