When you log on to Orbitz to find that perfect room for your next vacation, you may be thinking about the pool, or the view, or the chance to get away from it all. But the travel site you use and the hotel where you stay are thinking about something else: Who’s responsible for your taxes? Online travel providers and the hotel industry will clash next year over which side is responsible for forwarding taxes to state and local governments, setting up high-stakes battles in state capitals that are increasingly facing the question of how to tax Internet sales. In this case, the consumer’s bottom line may not change, but shifting the tax burden is a threat to travel providers still operating on narrow margins after a recession severely dented their balance sheets. The rate an online shopper sees now reflects a balance between hotels and the travel providers who sell their rooms. The online sites contract with hotels to sell rooms at below-market rates, then sell those rooms to the consumer at market rates; the difference is where Orbitz and Travelocity and Expedia make their profits. And even if the hotels are only receiving 80 percent of their regular rate, it’s better for them than to leave the rooms unoccupied. Get the full story at The Washington Post