It was a dark, scary night. The wind was howling and the lights were flickering. The hotel sign noted "friendly service" so we ventured in, hoping to find a reassuring face. Our overworked and traveled souls were craving a super comfortable bed and we remembered an ad for this hotel that promised sweet dreams and a relaxing experience. The word "welcome" appeared everywhere. Unfortunately, it was all a disguise to get us in the door. Our hopes for sweet dreams turned to instant nightmares before our heads even hit the bed. Someone had called in sick so one frenzied employee grunted at us from behind the desk. His disposition became more ghoulish and less welcoming with each question we asked. Frustrated, he just assigned us a room that appeared to be tortured by rather than cleaned by housekeeping. The smell of stale smoke filled the air and bed sheets and the mattress seemed a bit haunted with each squeak. We called to complain and were told we would have to speak to the manager about it….in the MORNING!

It sounded good. It looked good. But did it really end up being good? Misleading hospitality messages turn potentially loyal guests into untrusting souls and those who won’t come back. And since one bad story usually gets retold 10-20 times, each time with a bit more horror and drama (we all love to exaggerate and tell the bad stories), the long term impact and deterrent marketing can be powerfully disturbing.

As the Halloween season winds down, make sure using disguises is not a year round event relative to service delivery. Consider evaluating if your messages simply lure guests in or if they really deliver what the message promised. When hotels or other organizations promise hospitality on a variety of levels and the guest signs on, excuses and problems are not an option.

When a guest chooses a hotel, they have chosen based on the hospitality promise that the hotel makes. In Conde Naste Traveler’s recent Business Traveler Readers’ poll (October 2006), the top five things ranked by respondents were: location; comfortable bed; price; security; and SERVICE. How is each of these top five categories being positioned and how are they actually delivered? Have they been disguised or does the real thing show up?

Get the full story at Hotel Business Review