The data are interesting, to say the least, because consumers who were exposed exclusively to social media showed greater purchase proclivity than consumers who were exposed to social media in tandem with other advertising platforms. For example, consumers who were exposed exclusively to social media ads for KFC were seven times more likely to spend more than the average consumer. Meanwhile for the QSR category in aggregate, consumers exposed to social media plus billboard ads were twice as likely to spend more than the average consumer; the same result was observed (for Wendy's) with social media plus TV ads. Quite what all this means isn't clear, especially in light of the remarkable disparity between social media alone versus social media in combination with other media; for one thing, the preliminary study results (this was a preview) don't address the thorny issue of cause and effect. For example, are people who are exposed to social media brand advertising alone more likely to spend more than the average consumer because of the influence of social media -- or is it just that they are already loyal QSR customers, whose exposure to social media results from their pre-existing brand loyalty? Get the full story at MediaPost