While each chain and brand has defined a specific set of tactics for distributing rooms within the OTAs, Marriott and Starwood continue to aggressively steer consumers toward their brand sites even to the extent of foregoing top search placement within the OTAs. It appears these two brands view the major OTAs as expensive alternatives and want to control terms of distribution while providing lower cost distribution solutions to their branded properties. However, from a property perspective, owners and management companies may have different interests. If they are able to generate reservations at a reasonable cost, all things considered, then they may not have as much preference as to where the booking originates. That said, distribution costs do vary across channels and sites and consolidating two major hotel players could deepen the competitive divide between these particular Brands and the OTAs. This consolidation will also continue to affect other segments of hotel distribution, such as managed travel and group bookings. Most major hotel companies are responsible for a significant portion of a branded property's marketing. Corporate negotiated rates play a role in this since the chain will have more control over inventory and pricing for any market where they have a significant share of inventory. It is likely that this will enable the combined company to tactically respond to RFPs and more confidently set pricing levels for their existing and potential contracts. However, this doesn't change demand levels within a market unless they apply these tactics to shift business from certain destinations to other locations more than occurs today. CWT's Whitepaper recently summarized markets where the combined Marriott and Starwood brands represent a significant portion of their corporate negotiated business. Get the full story at Hospitality.Net