What do you do when your flight to San Francisco is cancelled at midnight and the airline insists on rebooking you and your spouse on two separate flights? Or you are watching the last few minutes of “Homeland” and the cable picture starts pixilating for the twentieth time this month? Or you have been waiting for two hours in an examining gown to see your dermatologist? Or your favorite gourmet cookie shop that says it is open Sundays until 8, isn’t? If you are like millions of consumers around the globe, you jump on Twitter, Facebook, your social media site-du-jour or your blog, and complain to friends, family, followers and the world about the lousy service you are experiencing. Perhaps you even locate the company’s Twitter handle, if it has one, and complain directly. Will people there answer? How quickly? Will they actually help? And will you go back on social media and report you are now a satisfied customer, or fume even more about their misguided (or lack of) response? When companies today try to meet their customers where they live, they increasingly find that it is on social media. Now that such sites are an integral part of the culture, using them for customer care is moving from cutting-edge concept to business necessity. That was the message from panelists at a session titled, “The Real Value of Social Media for Customer Service,” at the recent Wharton Social Media Best Practices Conference. Get the full story at Knowledge@Wharton