The platforms and tools of the current age of information aren’t much help when trying to learn about . They restrict our ability to learn more about things we cannot describe with words. And while the Internet has powered a new era of human networking and intelligence, the first information revolution fell short of realizing the potential of technology to provide us with the keys we need to fully unlock the world around us in any given moment. This isn’t a new development. Throughout history, our ability to express curiosity for the world around us has been limited only by the technology available. In today’s age of information, mobile devices and global connectivity have brought an impressive amount of knowledge to our very fingertips. The Internet and powerful text search tools enabled us to discover nearly everything about anything we can describe with words – any text that can be typed into a search engine. But words cannot express the reality of the entire human experience. That said, for all our advancements, the human experience remains largely driven by sight, as it has for millennia. Unsurprisingly, eyeballs have always had a shorter path to the brain than any other sense. And, our ability to quickly derive information and make decisions based on visual data evolved far before our ability to understand language and invent the alphabet. When the next information revolution arrives, it must then open the door to the physical, visual world and enable people to quickly discover contextual information about the objects and images around them. The future of discovery will be pointing at things we’re curious about and learning relevant information without even having to ask a question. This revolution will transform how we access shared knowledge and impact nearly every aspect of our lives at home and in the workplace. Get the full story at GigaOM