There are travel blogs and travel podcasts, and now, increasingly, there are travel "vlogs" and other types of online travel videos.

Some are slick and standard travelogues. Others, while professionally produced, are unconventional and artsy. But many are by true amateurs who just want to share their images of a place.

Travelocity's Video Gallery offers professional, narrated videos in a traditional travelogue format with titles like "An Introduction to Cape Cod" or "Exploring Atlanta." Most are under two minutes, and they are reminiscent of the types of feature segments you might find on a television travel show.

At Turnhere.com, you'll find charming videos that feel like mini-independent films with moody soundtracks, quirky narrators and offbeat subjects.

At Video.Google.com, type "travel" into the search box and you'll get everything from ads for a travel agency to a lurching, colorful video shot while riding in a pedicab in China.

Flyingmonk.com offers longer videos about cultural attractions around the world, accompanied by soundtracks of local music. You can buy the videos, borrow them from the public library or watch trailers three to four minutes in length of various destinations on the Flyingmonk.com Web site.

Source: Associated Press