Distribution

American cities that have been taken over by Airbnb

Nov 10, 2019 / Airbnb
Shutterstock
Shutterstock

Miami Beach crams in more of the short-term rental company’s properties per capita than anywhere else in the U.S., with roughly one Airbnb for every 15 of its 92,000 residents.

The saturation has prompted Miami Beach to fight back, joining the ranks of cities trying to police Airbnb and other short-term rentals. The tussles with Miami Beach and cities such as New York City and Chicago are the thorniest obstacle facing Airbnb as it plans to sell shares on public markets. In Jersey City, New Jersey, residents voted overwhelmingly on Tuesday to limit short-term rentals.

Many of the fights come down to cities trying to keep control over how residential properties are used, while preventing what are essentially mini, unlicensed hotel businesses. Airbnb and Miami Beach recently settled a lawsuit, requiring hosts to list registration numbers so the city can verify that hosts are behaving within the law. But the city is now defending in court its ability to fine hosts up to $100,000 for multiple violations of the rules.

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Booking Holdings sees brand collaborations as key to restoring growth on steroids

Nov 10, 2019 / Booking.com
Booking Holdings
Booking Holdings

Are online travel agencies’ glory days, when revenue was growing 25 or 30 percent and room nights booked were jumping at similar clips, long-gone history?

In contrast to Expedia Group and TripAdvisor, which posted weak third quarters and saw their market caps sliced up on Thursday, Booking Holdings reported $2 billion in net income, a 10 percent leap. Its room night growth, however, was a not-spectacular 11 percent - the same as Expedia’s - and revenue growth clocked merely 4 percent growth to $5 billion.

Contrast Booking Holdings third-quarter performance to its third quarter of 2015, for example, when room nights grew 22 percent and revenue climbed 9.4 percent. In the third quarter of 2013 and 2014, respectively, room night growth stood at 35.6 percent and 26.7 percent, respectively.

Products & Services

Accor and Alibaba form alliance to improve ‘consumer experience’

Nov 10, 2019 / Accor
Accor
Accor

Accor and Alibaba Group have announced a strategic collaboration to develop a series of digital applications and loyalty programs to improve the consumer and traveler experience over the next five years.

The strategic collaboration will leverage Alibaba’s nearly 700 million consumers across its China retail marketplaces to enable more Chinese travelers to enjoy Accor’s world-class consumer offerings. It will allow for seamless integration of Accor’s customer journeys within Alibaba’s comprehensive ecosystem.

Alibaba’s travel arm Fliggy will allow consumers to book hotels, access catering services, book entertainment and take advantage of other lifestyle services. Payments can be made using Alipay, a digital payment service operated by Alibaba affiliate Ant Financial.

Accor will also offer Chinese consumers a hassle-free hotel experience through its “Haoke” program – geared towards Chinese travelers.

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Airlines face triple challenge as global demand slows

Nov 10, 2019 / Airlines
Shutterstock
Shutterstock

The global airline sector faces serious headwinds against a triple challenge of economic decline, punitive taxes and regulation.

The warning was issued as Iata released figures for September showing an eighth consecutive month of below-average demand growth.

European carriers suffered the weakest performance this year.

The result was affected by the demise of a number of airlines such as Thomas Cook, along with pilot strikes in addition to slowing economic activity and faltering business confidence in many key European economies.

Products & Services

The future of restaurants? Tech-driven - and complicated

Nov 10, 2019 / F&B
Louis Hansel/Unsplash
Louis Hansel/Unsplash

Technology will be one of the restaurant industry’s biggest assets over the next 10 years, even as that same technology helps to feed rising competition from non-food companies and delivery-only “virtual restaurants.”

These are among the more important findings of the National Restaurant Association’s Restaurant Industry 2030 report, which contains feedback and predictions from more than 100 industry experts.

“The off-premises market - carry out, delivery, drive-thru and mobile units - is where the majority of industry growth is going to come from over the next 10 years,” the report notes in an introduction that declares “restaurants have become a now industry.”

In fact, the very definition of “restaurant” is a work in progress.