Distribution

Hotels across Mediterranean suffer bitter blow from Thomas Cook failure

Sep 25, 2019 / Thomas Cook
Shutterstock
Shutterstock

Hoteliers across the world braced for major losses after the collapse of Thomas Cook, who always paid in arrears - and its last payment was for the month of June.

In Greece, Spain, and Turkey - Thomas Cook’s most popular summer destinations - the bankruptcy threatens to strike a devastating blow to communities that are economically reliant on package tourism.

Grigoris Tasios, head of Greece’s PanHellenic Federation of Hoteliers, believes that losses to his country’s hotel owners could amount to €300m, including €80m-€100m in Crete, Greece’s most popular destination for package holidays.

At this point in the season, most hotels on the island have accumulated considerable debt to suppliers - a million or two euros at a big resort, for example, or half a million at a smaller hotel.

Transportation

Ryanair and Expedia settle screen-scraping lawsuits

Sep 25, 2019 / Ryanair
Ryanair
Ryanair

Ryanair and Expedia appear to have made peace - or at least they’ve settled lawsuits that the low-cost carrier filed more than two years ago.

Asked about the U.S. lawsuit, which was settled in Washington state in early August, Expedia Group spokesperson Sarah Waffle Gavin confirmed to Skift on Tuesday “the Irish action was part of the settlement and is in the process of being dismissed as well.”

The lawsuit in a federal court in Washington was dismissed with prejudice, meaning it can’t be brought again. Terms of the settlement were confidential but from outward appearances, it appears as though Ryanair walked away with a win.

Loyalty Program

Marriott on sticking with Bonvoy through the scorn

Sep 25, 2019 / Marriott
Marriott International
Marriott International

Hotel chain expected some backlash when it rebranded its loyalty program earlier this year.

When Marriott rebranded its loyalty program following its merger with Starwood, the hospitality giant encountered a fair amount of derision from consumers who found the new name, Bonvoy, rather confusing.

The January rebrand elicited reactions such as disbelief that it wasn’t a joke and simply “lol.” Yet the company had to move forward past such negativity, said Scott Weisenthal VP of global creative and content marketing at Marriott International.

Speaking at a panel on rebranding iconic brands at Advertising Week on Tuesday afternoon, Weisenthal noted that he would have been surprised had there not been “negative reaction” to the rollout of Bonvoy, an abbreviation of the phrase “bon voyage.”

Distribution

Groupon partners with DerbySoft for hotel bookings

Sep 25, 2019 / Groupon
Groupon
Groupon

The new partnership allows Groupon Getaways to work with more of the world’s leading hotel brands and access room availability, view nightly rates and directly book reservations.

For DerbySoft, the agreement gives their supply partners access to Groupon’s 29 million customers in North America––helping them to better achieve their goals, drive sales and increase revenue growth.

Booking is a key part of Groupon’s voucher-less initiative aimed at improving the redemption experience, providing always-on availability, giving consumers more reasons to buy and opening up the Groupon marketplace to a broader range of suppliers.

Groupon increased bookable inventory 12 percent year over year and booked tens of millions of travelers, diners, concert-goers, spa visitors and more in 2018.

Transportation

IATA: Flying is not the enemy

Sep 25, 2019 / Airlines
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Shutterstock

The airline industry is on the defensive against climate activists as the aviation arm of the United Nation convenes for its assembly in Montreal.

"Flying is not the enemy," IATA director general Alexandre de Juniac said on a conference call with the media Tuesday morning. "Flying allows people to connect. It's a great achievement that makes our world a better place. The real enemy is carbon."

Sure to be a major topic at the ICAO Assembly is CORSIA, the carbon reduction, and offsetting scheme. CORSIA aims to cap airline emissions on international flights at 2020 levels. Airlines with emissions that exceed that level will be required to purchase carbon-offset credits. The scheme goes into effect in 2021.